Sunday, March 31, 2019

Final hours to save: Subscribe now for $1 a week.

Time is growing short: Take advantage of The Times Sale now.
The New York Times View in browser
 
Put events into perspective.  The Times Sale | Subscribe for $1 a week.  Ends today.
 
VIEW OFFER
 
 
 
 
 
The political impact of the Green New Deal. The prescription drugs that rich people buy. The teams to watch as opening day approaches. Take a front row seat to the stories shaping our world at this special rate.
 
Subscribe for $1 a week.
 
Ends today.
 
 
 
VIEW OFFER
 
 
 
Cancel anytime.
 
 
 
 
No commitment required. Cancel anytime.
 
Offer expires April 1, 2019, 10 a.m. E.T. Your payment method will automatically be charged $4 in advance every 4 weeks for Basic Digital access. You will be charged the introductory offer rate for the introductory period of one year, and thereafter will be charged the standard rate every 4 weeks until you cancel. All subscriptions renew automatically. You can cancel anytime. All Access Digital and Home Delivery options are also available at special introductory rates. These offers are not available for current subscribers. Other restrictions and taxes may apply. Offers and pricing are subject to change without notice.
 
This email was sent to baltimoreonlinebusiness.jody1@blogger.com
 
Account Login | Help Center
Attn.: Customer Service, P.O. Box 8041, Davenport, IA 52808-8041
 
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Unsubscribe
 
©2019 The New York Times Company | 620 Eighth Ave., New York, NY 10018
 
 
                                                           

Ends today: $1 a week when you subscribe now.

Mining the details to bring you the bigger picture.
The New York Times View in browser
 
Put events into perspective.  The Times Sale | Subscribe for $1 a week.  Ends today.
 
VIEW OFFER
 
 
 
 
 
The political impact of the Green New Deal. The prescription drugs that rich people buy. The teams to watch as opening day approaches. Take a front row seat to the stories shaping our world at this special rate.
 
Subscribe for $1 a week.
 
Ends today.
 
 
 
VIEW OFFER
 
 
 
Cancel anytime.
 
 
 
 
No commitment required. Cancel anytime.
 
Offer expires April 1, 2019, 10 a.m. E.T. Your payment method will automatically be charged $4 in advance every 4 weeks for Basic Digital access. You will be charged the introductory offer rate for the introductory period of one year, and thereafter will be charged the standard rate every 4 weeks until you cancel. All subscriptions renew automatically. You can cancel anytime. All Access Digital and Home Delivery options are also available at special introductory rates. These offers are not available for current subscribers. Other restrictions and taxes may apply. Offers and pricing are subject to change without notice.
 
This email was sent to baltimoreonlinebusiness.jody1@blogger.com
 
Account Login | Help Center
Attn.: Customer Service, P.O. Box 8041, Davenport, IA 52808-8041
 
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Unsubscribe
 
©2019 The New York Times Company | 620 Eighth Ave., New York, NY 10018
 
 
                                                           

Saturday, March 30, 2019

Ends tomorrow: The Times for $1 a week.

Informed viewpoints. Intelligent debate.
The New York Times View in browser
 
Not just what's happening.  But why.  The Times Sale | Subscribe for $1 a week.  Ends tomorrow.
 
VIEW OFFER
 
 
 
 
 
Whether parsing economic divides or uncovering the next wave of “unicorn” start-ups, our journalists dig deep to bring you the full story, context included. Subscribe to The Times with this special offer and enjoy greater insight and understanding on the topics that interest you most.
 
Subscribe for $1 a week.
 
Ends tomorrow.
 
 
 
VIEW OFFER
 
 
 
Cancel anytime.
 
 
 
 
No commitment required. Cancel anytime.
 
Offer expires April 1, 2019, 10 a.m. E.T. Your payment method will automatically be charged $4 in advance every 4 weeks for Basic Digital access. You will be charged the introductory offer rate for the introductory period of one year, and thereafter will be charged the standard rate every 4 weeks until you cancel. All subscriptions renew automatically. You can cancel anytime. All Access Digital and Home Delivery options are also available at special introductory rates. These offers are not available for current subscribers. Other restrictions and taxes may apply. Offers and pricing are subject to change without notice.
 
This email was sent to baltimoreonlinebusiness.jody1@blogger.com
 
Account Login | Help Center
Attn.: Customer Service, P.O. Box 8041, Davenport, IA 52808-8041
 
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Unsubscribe
 
©2019 The New York Times Company | 620 Eighth Ave., New York, NY 10018
 
 
                                                           

Friday, March 29, 2019

Your Friday Evening Briefing

Mueller Report, Brexit, N.C.A.A.
View in Browser | Add nytdirect@nytimes.com to your address book.

Friday, March 29, 2019

Your Friday Evening Briefing
By REMY TUMIN AND MARCUS PAYADUE
Good evening. Here's the latest.
Wayne Partlow/Associated Press
1. "Everyone will soon be able to read it."
That was Attorney General William Barr, who said he planned to publicly release a redacted version of the 400-page Mueller report by mid-April, if not sooner. In his letter to the chairmen of the congressional judiciary committees, above, Mr. Barr added that the White House would not see the document before he sent it to Congress.
He plans to testify on Capitol Hill in early May, shortly after the report is released, to discuss it with lawmakers.
In other news out of Washington, President Trump warned he would close the Mexican border "next week" over immigration, escalating a repeated threat — but one he has not acted on.
_____
Kirsty Wigglesworth/Associated Press
2. Brexit is in ruins: Parliament rejected Prime Minister Theresa May's Brexit plan for a third time, just two weeks before the April 12 date to leave the E.U.
The vote effectively sets the process back to square one almost three years after Britons voted to leave. On Monday, Parliament will try to muster a majority for an alternative path to leaving the bloc, and then challenge Mrs. May to make it work.
If that fails, the country faces the very real possibility of leaving the E.U. without a deal, which many fear will have grave economic implications, or requesting another extension from the bloc's leaders.
One man is trying to make sense of Brexit, one flowchart at a time. He would like to stop now.
_____
Ivan Alvarado/Reuters
3. Venezuela agreed to let the Red Cross deliver aid. It's the first tacit admission by President Nicolás Maduro of a humanitarian crisis.
Access to and the distribution of basic supplies have become a main battleground between Mr. Maduro and the opposition leader, Juan Guaidó, who have both attempted to control supplies of aid for political advantage. The Red Cross, pictured above in Caracas, said it would begin delivery of medical supplies as soon as mid-April.
In other international news, we visited a camp in Syria where women and children who fled ISIS territory are stuck in limbo after the group's collapse.
_____
Mike Blake/Reuters
3. Lyft began trading at $87 a share, soaring above its public offering price and reflecting investor demand for fast-growing tech companies.
Some of the gains faded soon after the debut, but at the I.P.O. price, Lyft had a market value of over $24 billion, making it one of the most valuable American companies to go public in the last decade.
As unicorn companies like Lyft ride into the public markets, their elite early investors will be the biggest winners. But not everyone who invested in the company is reaping the spoils.
_____
Gregg Vigliotti for The New York Times
5. A measles outbreak among ultra-Orthodox Jews is spreading fear and stoking tensions with secular neighbors in a New York suburb.
The authorities in Rockland County declared a state of emergency over the outbreak and have traced the spread of measles to ultra-Orthodox families whose children have not been vaccinated. Above, a father and child in Monsey, N.Y.
Some residents are now wiping public bus seats and crossing the street when they see ultra-Orthdox Jews. Hasidic leaders in the area are concerned about a rise in anti-Semitism and public health authorities stepping into their cloistered community.
_____
<span><span> </span></span>  
6. Prison transport companies have been involved in more than 50 crashes, 60 escapes and 19 deaths since 2000. But no one holds them accountable — even when people die.
Federal agencies that are supposed to oversee the industry almost never act, and because the vans, like the one pictured above, cross state and county lines, local officials can say they don't have jurisdiction.
We took a look at how one company has dodged responsibility for one inmate, Johnny Smith, who was charged with possession of a single oxycodone pill. He died in the back of a prison van in 2011. The for-profit company owes his family $650,000, and it still hasn't paid.
_____
Matt Rourke/Associated Press
7. Opening day set expectations very high.
The Los Angeles Dodgers had eight home runs, breaking the opening-day record (the final score was 12-5). Bryce Harper made his debut with the Philadelphia Phillies after signing a 13-year, $330 million contract. Robinson Cano and Jacob deGrom led the Mets to a win. And the Yankees clobbered the Baltimore Orioles 7-2. Our baseball columnist considers what it means for their World Series prospects.
In the N.C.A.A. men's basketball tournament: The East and Midwest regions face off beginning just after 7 p.m. in the latest round of 16 play, including No. 1 Duke vs. No. 4 Virginia Tech, and No. 1 North Carolina vs. Auburn. Here's what to expect from the women's round of 16, which begins tonight.
_____
Kevin Winter/Getty Images For KROQ/Entercom
8. Billie Eilish has already had a billion plays of her songs, appeared with Ellen DeGeneres and Jimmy Fallon and performed to large sold-out crowds. Ms. Eilish, 17, is just getting started.
Her striking aesthetic is what our music critic calls a "collective middle finger to the strictures of teen-pop sex appeal," with the musicality of an "edgy, genre-agnostic (but playlist-friendly) fusion that sounds like pop and streams like hip-hop." She may very well become a household name.
In other debuts, Salman Rushdie reviews a sweeping new novel about the roots of modern Zambia. And what's old is new again: On Monday, a new generation of viewers will get its own version of "The Twilight Zone" with Jordan Peele's revival. Here's why we still care about the series.
_____
Roger Ressmeyer/Corbis -- VCG, via Getty Images
9. Moving on to the lost history of one of the world's strangest science experiments, and one of our most read stories today:
In a news analysis in this weekend's Sunday Review, our science columnist Carl Zimmer takes a look at the significance of Biosphere 2, which opened in 1991 in Arizona. Its geodesic domes and pyramids contained a miniature rain forest, a mangrove, a desert, a coral reef — and eight people, sealed inside to see if they could survive. Above, candidates for the Biosphere 2 with test modules in 1988.
"The project would later be dismissed as a folly and a waste of effort," he writes. "And yet, 25 years on, it's an experiment worth rediscovering. Biosphere 2 might have some lessons to offer about managing Biosphere 1 — our planet."
_____
Fred Tanneau/Agence France-Presse â€" Getty Images
10. Finally, a grumpy cat mystery is solved.
For three decades, bright orange novelty phones shaped like the cartoon cat Garfield kept washing up on the shoreline of Brittany, in western France. Nobody knew where they came from, until now.
Volunteers cleaning the beaches last week discovered a long-lost shipping container in a craggy nook. Because of rising tides, the sea cave is accessible only a few days each year. Once advertised by Tyco as "real phones for real fun," they are now mostly a real nuisance along the Brittany coast.
Have a lazy weekend.
_____
Your Evening Briefing is posted at 6 p.m. Eastern.
And don't miss Your Morning Briefing. Sign up here to get it by email in the Australian, Asian, European or American morning.
Want to catch up on past briefings? You can browse them here.
What did you like? What do you want to see here? Let us know at briefing@nytimes.com.

LIKE THIS EMAIL?
Forward it to your friends, and let them know they can sign up here.

NEED HELP?
Review our newsletter help page or contact us for assistance.

ADVERTISEMENT
FOLLOW NYTimes
Get more NYTimes.com newsletters »
|
Copyright 2019 The New York Times Company
620 Eighth Avenue New York, NY 10018