Friday, August 31, 2018

Your Friday Evening Briefing

Aretha Franklin, Nafta, U.S. Open |
View in Browser | Add nytdirect@nytimes.com to your address book.

Friday, August 31, 2018

Your Friday Evening Briefing
By JOUMANA KHATIB AND VIRGINIA LOZANO
Good evening. Here's the latest.
Eric Baradat/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
1. A sigh of relief for Nafta.
The White House indicated it wanted to include Canada in the pact, capping a day of tense talks between U.S. and Canadian negotiators. Above, Chrystia Freeland, Canada's foreign affairs minister.
Earlier in the day, as representatives struggled to come to an agreement on several points and President Trump continuing to disparage Canada and its trade practices, there were fears that the last-ditch talks to salvage the trade agreement could falter.
The U.S. had threatened to move ahead with a bilateral trade pact with just Mexico if an agreement between the three countries could not be reached by Friday.
The talks will resume next week.
_____
Win Mcnamee/Getty Images North America
2. A lobbyist linked to Paul Manafort admitted to helping Russian and Ukrainian businessmen illegally buy tickets to President Trump's inauguration.
The lobbyist, Sam Patten, pleaded guilty to failing to register as a foreign agent, and agreed to cooperate with prosecutors as part of his agreement.
He could provide insight into a range of activity and individuals relevant to the special counsel investigation, as well as possible connections between Mr. Trump, his associates and Russia.
_____
Laura McDermott for The New York Times
3. A homegoing for Aretha Franklin.
Thousands gathered at Greater Grace Temple, a Baptist church in Detroit, to remember the Queen of Soul, including Bill Clinton, Stevie Wonder, Smokey Robinson and the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson. Outside, more than 100 pink Cadillacs lined up as part of the funeral procession.
During the five-hour service, Mr. Clinton described himself as a "groupie." And as Mr. Sharpton put it: "We don't all agree on everything, but we agree on Aretha."
_____
Erin Schaff for The New York Times
4. Meanwhile, in Washington, members of Congress gathered at the Capitol to remember John McCain.
Mr. McCain did not want President Trump to attend his remembrances, and Vice President Mike Pence came as an emissary of the White House. "We respect his service to the country," Mr. Pence said.
The services for Mr. McCain will continue over the weekend.
_____
Climate Impact Lab/The New York Times
5. No, you're (probably) not imagining things: Your hometown may be getting hotter.
As the world warms because of human-induced climate change, most of us can expect to see more days when temperatures hit 90 degrees Fahrenheit (32 degrees Celsius) or higher.
Some parts of the globe — especially already hot tropical cities like Jakarta and New Delhi — could see even more heat in the future. But it's all about adaptation, experts say.
So if you're one of the 40 percent of households in Montreal without air conditioning, you may need to rethink things soon.
Try out our tool to predict how your town is expected to fare.
_____
Facundo Arrizabalaga/EPA, via Shutterstock
6. Consumers are spurning sugary drinks, but Coca-Cola is trying to lure them with something different: coffee.
The American beverage titan said Friday that it planned to buy Costa, one of the world's biggest coffee chains, for 3.9 billion pounds, or $5.1 billion, in cash.
It would be Coke's biggest acquisition of a brand, and comes after five years of falling sales.
_____
Karsten Moran for The New York Times
7. "Unfortunately and fortunately we have to play each other."
Serena and Venus Williams will face off tonight at the U.S. Open — their 30th time squaring off in over 20 years.
The last time they played one another, in 2017, Serena prevailed despite being two months pregnant, with Venus one of the select few aware of the circumstances.
"It was two against one," Venus recalled. "At least this time it will be fair."
Theirs is the headline match this evening, so be sure to check back for live updates and results.
_____
Drew Angerer/Getty Images
8. The Village Voice, the storied alternative weekly that helped define a new generation of publications, will close.
Its death comes as something as of anticlimax. The paper's owner, Peter Barbey, shuttered its print edition last year, and its top editor, who left in May, was never replaced.
"This is a sad day for The Village Voice and for millions of readers," Mr. Barbey wrote in a statement. "As the first modern alternative newspaper, it literally defined a new genre of publishing."
_____
Dmitry Kostyukov for The New York Times
9. "Spring forward, fall back" no more — at least in the E.U.
The bloc's leaders indicated they would drop a rule requiring member states to abide by daylight saving time, leaving it to countries to decide for themselves whether to change clocks.
Millions of Europeans who responded to a survey were overwhelmingly in favor of abolishing it, and the bloc had been pressured to scrap the rule by places like Finland, Poland and the Baltic States.
_____
 
10. Finally, your briefing writers are observing the holiday weekend, so there won't be a Weekend Briefing on Sunday or Morning Briefing on Monday.
But we have you covered. Try your hand at this week's news quiz, or find suggestions on what to read, watch and listen to from the Book Review, Watching or our music critics' latest playlist.
Have a great weekend, and we'll see you Tuesday.
_____
Your Evening Briefing is posted at 6 p.m. Eastern.
And don't miss Your Morning Briefing. Sign up here to get it by email in the Australian, Asian, European or American morning.
Want to catch up on past briefings? You can browse them here.
What did you like? What do you want to see here? Let us know at briefing@nytimes.com.

LIKE THIS EMAIL?

Forward it to your friends, and let them know they can sign up here.

ADVERTISEMENT
Sponsor a Subscription
Inspire the future generation of readers by contributing to The Times's sponsor-a-subscription program.
For questions, email sponsor@nytimes.com or call 1-844-698-2677.
FOLLOW NYTimes
Get more NYTimes.com newsletters »
|
Copyright 2018 The New York Times Company
620 Eighth Avenue New York, NY 10018

Thursday, August 30, 2018

Your Thursday Evening Briefing

John McCain, Colin Kaepernick, U.S. Open |
View in Browser | Add nytdirect@nytimes.com to your address book.

Thursday, August 30, 2018

Your Thursday Evening Briefing
By JOUMANA KHATIB AND VIRGINIA LOZANO
Good evening. Here's the latest.
Robyn Beck/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
1. "With John, it was a value set that was neither selfish nor self-serving."
That was Joe Biden, the former vice president, eulogizing John McCain, the Arizona politician who died over the weekend. Thousands gathered in Phoenix to remember Mr. McCain, including sports stars and family members.
On Friday, Mr. McCain will lie in state in Washington (here's what that means). There will be a memorial service on Saturday at the National Cathedral, and he will be buried near his alma mater, the Naval Academy, in Annapolis, Md., on Sunday. Here is a look at how he has been honored across the country.
_____
Gretchen Ertl for The New York Times
2. Asian-Americans have a new ally in their affirmative action case against Harvard: the Justice Department.
"Harvard has failed to carry its demanding burden to show that its use of race does not inflict unlawful racial discrimination on Asian-Americans," the department wrote in a court filing.
Students are suing the university, saying its affirmative action policies discriminate against Asian-American applicants.
_____
Scott Cunningham/Getty Images
3. Colin Kaepernick won a round.
In a blow to the N.F.L., an arbitrator ruled that the quarterback's collusion case could proceed to a full hearing.
The reason: Mr. Kaepernick produced sufficient evidence that the league and its owners colluded to keep him off the field because of his protests during the playing of the national anthem.
_____
Michael Sohn/Associated Press
4. It's getting hard to predict car prices.
That's because it's hard to tell what tariffs will be in play — if any. The E.U.'s top trade official said the bloc would consider cutting "car tariffs to zero, all tariffs to zero, if the U.S. does the same."
Automobile tariffs are also a central part of Canada's negotiations in Washington, aimed at reaching a deal by Friday to stay in the North American Free Trade Agreement.
By the way, our Wheels column offers a spirited defense of the minivan, "magical for simplifying life."
_____
Doug Mills/The New York Times
5. Two things related to #MeToo:
Our reporters found out from several associates of President Trump that his former fixer, Michael Cohen, had planned to buy up dirt on Mr. Trump dating to the 1980s from The National Enquirer and its parent company.
And our culture desk reports that comedy clubs are ready for Louis C. K.'s return, even if many people aren't (our contributing opinion writer Roxane Gay, for instance).
_____
Joseph Prezioso/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
6. Threats against The Boston Globe:
The F.B.I. said it had charged a California man who threatened repeatedly to kill employees of the newspaper, starting immediately after The Globe announced on Aug. 10 that it would publish a coordinated editorial response to political attacks on the media.
The man, Robert Chain, threatened to shoot employees in the head and kill "every" Globe employee, the F.B.I. said.
His threats included accusing them of being "the enemy of the people," a phrase frequently used by President Trump, as recently as this morning.
_____
Fred Dufour/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
7. China slapped back after President Trump tried to make it the scapegoat for his administration's stalled negotiations with North Korea.
In a series of tweets labeled "Statement From the White House," Mr. Trump said China was shipping "money, fuel, fertilizer and various other commodities" to North Korea.
A spokeswoman for China's Ministry of Foreign Affairs tartly dismissed the comments on Thursday, saying, "Sorry, we cannot accept, and will not accept, all the fancy buck-passing by the U.S. side." She added that the U.S. was using "irresponsible 'magical logic' that distorts facts."
_____
Demetrius Freeman for The New York Times
8. Day 4 of the U.S. Open:
Roger Federer breezed into the third round with a 7-5, 6-4, 6-4 victory over BenoƮt Paire. And Angelique Kerber, above, the reigning Wimbledon champion, righted the ship in time to escape with a second-round win.
Novak Djokovic and Caroline Wozniacki also head to the courts today. Check back for live updates and results.
And yes, it's still hot.
_____
Jack Mitchell/Getty Images
9. The choreographer Paul Taylor, who brought poetry and lyricism to modern dance, has died at 88.
Mr. Taylor "created poignant and exuberant works that entered the repertory of numerous dance companies," our critic Alastair Macaulay wrote, including for the choreographers Merce Cunningham, Martha Graham and George Balanchine. And his own company ranked among the most inventive and best in the world.
_____
Dmitry Kostyukov for The New York Times
10. Finally, some of you may be starting the holiday weekend a little early, and we'd hate for you to miss the Week in Good News.
Among the offerings: stories about the rise of urban beekeeping in Paris, above; a $15 minimum wage for Disney workers; and a new dawn for night owls.
For the rest of you, your briefing writer will be back tomorrow. But we're off for the weekend and Labor Day.
Have a wonderful evening.
_____
Your Evening Briefing is posted at 6 p.m. Eastern.
And don't miss Your Morning Briefing. Sign up here to get it by email in the Australian, Asian, European or American morning.
Want to catch up on past briefings? You can browse them here.
What did you like? What do you want to see here? Let us know at briefing@nytimes.com.

LIKE THIS EMAIL?

Forward it to your friends, and let them know they can sign up here.

ADVERTISEMENT
Sponsor a Subscription
Inspire the future generation of readers by contributing to The Times's sponsor-a-subscription program.
For questions, email sponsor@nytimes.com or call 1-844-698-2677.
FOLLOW NYTimes
Get more NYTimes.com newsletters »
|
Copyright 2018 The New York Times Company
620 Eighth Avenue New York, NY 10018